2019 Trends in Data Governance: The Model Governance Question

From an AI Business Article by Jelani Harper – November 2018

The propagation of the enterprise’s ability to capitalize on data-driven processes—to effectively reap data’s yield as an organizational asset, much like any other—hinges on data governance, which arguably underpins the foundation of data management itself.

There are numerous trends impacting that foundation, many of which have always had, and will continue to have, relevance as 2019 looms. Questions of regulatory compliance, data lineage, metadata management, and even data governance will all play crucial roles.

Franz’s CEO, Dr. Jans Aasman was quoted:

Still, as Aasman denoted, “It’s extremely complicated to make fair [machine learning] models with all the context around them.” Both rules and human supervision of models can furnish a fair amount of context for them, serving as starting points for their consistent governance.

Read the full article at AI Business.




AI Requires More Than Machine Learning

From Forbes Technology Council – October 2018

This article discusses the facets of machine learning and AI:

Lauded primarily for its automation and decision support, machine learning is undoubtedly a vital component of artificial intelligence. However, a small but growing number of thought leaders throughout the industry are acknowledging that the breadth of AI’s upper cognitive capabilities involves more than just machine learning.

Machine learning is all about sophisticated pattern recognition. It’s virtually unsurpassable at determining relevant, predictive outputs from a series of data-driven inputs. Nevertheless, there is a plethora of everyday, practical business problems that cannot be solved with input/output reasoning alone. The problems also require the multistep, symbolic reasoning of rules-based systems.

Whereas machine learning is rooted in a statistical approach, symbolic reasoning is predicated on the symbolic representation of a problem usually rooted in a knowledge base. Most rules-based systems involve multistep reasoning, including those powered by coding languages such as Prolog.

 

Read the full article over at Forbes

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Transmuting Machine Learning into Verifiable Knowledge

From AI Business – August 2018

This article covers machine learning and AI:

According to Franz CEO Jans Aasman, these machine learning deployments not only maximize organizational investments in them by driving business value, but also optimize the most prominent aspects of the data systems supporting them.

“You start with the raw data…do analytics on it, get interesting results, then you put the results of the machine learning back in the database, and suddenly you have a far more powerful database,” Aasman said.

Dr. Aasman is further quoted:

For internal applications, organizations can use machine learning concepts (such as co-occurrence—how often defined concepts occur together) alongside other analytics to monitor employee behavior, efficiency, and success with customers or certain types of customers. Aasman mentioned a project management use case for a consultancy company in which these analytics were used to “compute for every person, or every combination of persons, whether or not the project was successful: meaning, done on time to the satisfaction of the customer.”

Organizations can use whichever metrics are relevant for their businesses to qualify success. This approach is useful for determining a numerical rating for employees “and you could put that rating back in the database,” Aasman said. “Now you can do a follow up query where you say how much money did I make on the top 10 successful people; how much money did I lose on the top 10 people I don’t make a profit on.”

 

Read the full article over at AI Business.

 




Venture Beat Features Montefiore’s Healthcare project with AllegroGraph

From VentureBeat August 2018

This article discusses Montefiore’s PALM project that uses AllegroGraph:

Montefiore is one of the largest employers in New York State. It’s also one of the busiest health care complexes — hundreds of thousands of patients pass through its sprawling campuses, which include Montefiore Medical Center, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Montefiore Medical Park.

Those logistical challenges catalyzed the development of Montefiore’s Patient-centered Analytical Learning Machine (PALM), a machine learning platform built from the ground up to predict and prevent life-threatening medical conditions and minimize wait times.

PALM juggles lots of datasets — electronic medical records, insurance billing codes, drug databases, and clinical trial results, to name a few. And its analytical models recently expanded to handle voice, images, and sensor inputs from internet of things devices.

Core to the semantic graph model are triplestores, which are a type of database optimized for filing away and retrieving triples. They’re an entity composed of subject-predicate-object — “John has tuberculosis,” for example — which PALM builds dynamically, as needed. Along the way, the system uses a frame data language, or FDL, to resolve ambiguities, like when some electronic records refer to medication by its brand instead of by its scientific name (e.g., “Advil” or “Motrin” instead of ibuprofen).

Read the full article over at Venture Beat.

 




The Cornerstone of Data Science: Progressive Data Modeling

From AI Business June 27, 2018

This article covers Single Schema, Universal Taxonomies, Time Series Analysis, Accelerating Data Science and features some thought leadership from Franz Inc.’s CEO, Jans Aasman:

‘Contemporary data science and artificial intelligence requirements simply can’t wait for this ongoing, dilatory process. According to Jans Aasman, CEO of Franz, they no longer have to. By deploying what Aasman called an “events-based approach to schema”, companies can model datasets with any number of differences alongside one another for expedited enterprise value.’

‘The resulting schema is simplified, uniform, and useful in multiple ways. “You achieve two goals,” Aasman noted. “One is you define what data you trust to be in the main repository to have all the truth. The second thing is you make your data management a little more uniform. By doing those two things your AI and your data science will become better, because the data that goes into them is better.”’

Dr. Aasman goes on to note:

‘The events-based schema methodology only works with enterprise taxonomies—or at least with taxonomies spanning the different sources included in a specific repository, such as a Master Data Management hub. Taxonomies are necessary so that “the type of event can be specified,” Aasman said.’

‘Moreover, taxonomies are indispensable for clarifying terms and their meaning across different data formats, which may represent similar concepts in distinct ways. Therefore, practically all objects in a database should be “taxonomy based” Aasman said, because these hierarchical classifications enable organizations to query their repositories via this uniform schema.’

Read the full article over at AI Business.




How AI Boosts Human Expertise at Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer, a long time AllegroGraph customer, recently spoke with Alex Woodie at Datanami to describe how they are using AI tools such at AllegroGraph:

Thousands of companies around the world rely on Wolters Kluwer’s practice management software to automate core aspects of their businesses. That includes doctor’s offices that use its software make healthcare decisions in a clinical setting, corporate law offices that use its software to understand M&A activities, and accounting firms that use its software to craft tax strategies for high net-worth clients.

Wolters Kluwer is embedding a range of AI capabilities – including deep learning and graph analytics — across multiple product lines. For example, its Legalview Bill Analyzer software helps to identify errors in legal bills sent from outside law firms to the corporate counsels of large companies. The typical recovery rate for people reviewing bills manually is 1% to 2%. By adding machine learning technology to the product the recovery rate jumps to 7% to 8%, which can translate into tens of millions of dollars.

Wolters Kluwer is using graph analytic techniques to accelerate the knowledge discovery process for its clients across various professions. The company has tapped Franz‘s AllegroGraph software to help it drive new navigational tools for helping customers find answers to their questions.

By arranging known facts and concepts as triples in the AllegroGraph database and then exposing those structures to users through a traditional search engine dialog box, Wolters Kluwer is able to surface related insights in a much more interactive manner.

“We’re providing this live feedback. As you’re typing, we’re providing question and suggestions for you live,” Tatham said. “AllegroGraph gives us a performant way to be able to just work our way through the whole knowledge model and come up with suggestion to the user in real time.”

Read the full article over at Datanami.